Tag Archives: Spring

Natilla con Turrón de fresa (Custard topped with strawberry candy)

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Natillas (custard) were born inside European convents. When the Spaniards arrived to Mexico, they brought a great asset that would transform Mexican cuisine forever; THE NUNS. These hard-working dedicated women who spent long days in the kitchen had a sweet tooth, and they were not shy to share all their sweet delicacies. Natillas were one of the many delicacies they used to prepare, just a simple cheap and nutrient rich food, much needed to withstand those long working days.

Ingredients:

(Serves 4)

Natilla

  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 60g sugar
  • 1 vanilla bean (Scrape the seeds and use the stalk)
  • lemon rind 1 long piece
  • orange rind 2 long pieces
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 tbsp cornstarch
  • chopped pistachios

Turrón de Fresa

  • 250g strawberries (puree and strained)
  • 60g  raspberries (puree and strained)
  • 1 egg white
  • 250g sugar

Directions:

Natilla

Boil the milk with the lemon and orange rind, half the sugar and the vanilla bean. In another bowl whisk the egg yolks, cornstarch and the rest of the sugar. Whisk a bit of the warm milk into the egg yolks to temper them. Add the remaining milk while continuously whisking, bring back to the saucepan and cook in low heat whisking constantly until thickened. Divide the Natilla in 4 plates and refrigerate until set. To serve sprinkle the chopped pistachios and top with the Turrón de Fresa.

Turrón de Fresa

Mix all the ingredients in a deep bowl until double in size. Prepare it up to one hour before serving.

Sopita de Jitomate (Tomato Soup)

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Tomatoes are originally from Mexico and other  South American countries where Mayans and Aztecs domesticated and used them in their cuisine. The word Tomatoes, comes from the Nahuatl ‘tomatl’ (swollen fruit) which I am not surprised to learn; those really juicy and red “fruits” botanically speaking or “vegetables” culinary speaking, do look swollen.

Today, we can find these succulent jewels not only in the base of Mexican cuisine, but in cuisines from all over the world.

In Mexico, we have 2 kinds of tomatoes; green and red tomatoes. These 2 varieties help us create, in my opinion, the best salsas picantes the world has ever tasted.

I think that tomatoes are given for granted, so today, I have used red plum tomatoes as the main stars of this exquisite and warm-your-heart soup that will surely remind you just how good they are.

Ingredients:

(Serves 6)

  • 8 ripe red plum tomatoes
  • 4 celery stalks (Cut in chunks)
  • 3 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 3 1/2 cups of chicken stock
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 ripe avocados
  • 1/2 lime

Directions:

In a deep pan over medium heat,  sauté the tomatoes and celery with butter for 5 mins, put the lid on, and cook for a further 15 mins over medium heat. Transfer to a food processor and liquefy with the chicken stock.

Strain the tomato puree and pour back into the deep pan. Bring the soup back to medium low heat and cook for 15 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste.

In a separate bowl, mix the avocado and lemon juice using a fork to get a guacamole consistency.

Serve hot and top with a dollop of avocado mixture and coriander.